You’ve changed… (Course 5 Final Project)

“At laaaassssst….” (in my best Etta James voice.) I can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel! Much has happened in the past year and half and most had to do with my journey with Coetail. I didn’t know I was capable of communicating across timezones to educators from around the world. I’ve learned design principles that has made a positive impact in my teaching practice.  I’ve learned to embrace the available technology and make it work for me. I’ve changed!

My project with a flipped classroom was always in the background, but I never got around to sitting down, planning it and executing it. Thanks to my support group in the school, I took a risk and experimented with this concept with elementary students. A lot of time, sweat and tears (looking at you, iMovie for crashing on me) were shed just trying to get through this final phase. Thankfully, the result was worth it!

Coetail Online9 Course 5 Final Project Video

Project Goals

My goals for this project were to:

  • create a digital library of video tutorials
  • provide an opportunity to teach in small groups for students needing more support
  • challenge students needing advanced music literature
  • And personalize the learning for individual inquiry
  • provide an authentic audience (with other classes and/or schools)
  • empower students to create and spread the joy of music making
Extension

Due to the time constraints (as a specialist, I only see the students once a week), I am going to extend this unit so that the students will be able to create their very own tutorial videos. Not only does this learning experience allow them to demonstrate their music skills, but also to demonstrate their communication skills (can another student or audience understand what they are trying to teach?) and technology skills of creating a movie of their own. We would share our tutorial videos with other classes and hopefully other schools. What a great way to reach out to the community!

Video credits
  • August’s Rhapsody from the 2007 film August Rush
  • SAMR image from http://www.schrockguide.net/samr.html
  • Introduction photos courtesy of Pexels and Pixabay
Student engagement and feedback

As a whole, the students worked well during the unit and they embraced this “new” way of learning; however, not ALL students were keen to learn from a video:

Student feedback via Google Forms
"I love it [with the whole class] because in real life I can understand it more." Ibrahim
"...it's more better because the teacher help us and we can learn at the same time." Haya

Mixed reviews suggest to balance screen time and teacher time during the music class.

Read the last comment. Seriously? This kid can’t recognise MY voice in the videos? Ha!

FAQs

Q: Isn’t it a lot of prep work to create the videos BEFORE the students come?

A: Yes, lots of prep work. Because I’m a bit neurotic, I created my own videos using the same instruments/materials that the students will be using – for consistency. I’m sure there are thousands of videos out there that will be useful for your context.

Q: What platform did you use and why?

A: I used Seesaw as my platform. I initially thought about using Google Classroom; however, due to the time constraints and the fact that the students ALREADY had experience with Seesaw, it was a better choice for us.

Q: What were the cons during your project?

A: (1) Having a strong enough wifi connection for the whole class. (2) Students complained about not being able to hear themselves play because of the person next to them – it’s more of a space issue. In the future, I would probably split the group to where some students can be spread out in different areas of the room while I worked with the other half and then switch halfway through the class period.

Unit Plan 

Here is my IB PYP Music unit plan (based on the UbD framework).

ISTE Standards for Educators:

1 LEARNER: Educators continually improve their practice by learning from and with others and exploring proven and promising practices that leverage technology to improve student learning. Educators: 1a Set professional learning goals to explore and apply pedagogical approaches made possible by technology and reflect on their effectiveness.

2 LEADER: Educators seek out opportunities for leadership to support student empowerment and success and to improve teaching and learning. Educators: 2c Model for colleagues the identification, exploration, evaluation, curation and adoption of new digital resources and tools for learning.

4 COLLABORATOR: Educators dedicate time to collaborate with both colleagues and students to improve practice, discover and share resources and ideas, and solve problems. Educators: 4b Collaborate and co-learn with students to discover and use new digital resources and diagnose and troubleshoot technology issues.

5 DESIGNER: Educators design authentic, learner-driven activities and environments that recognise and accommodate learner variability. Educators: 5a Use technology to create, adapt and personalise learning experiences that foster independent learning and accommodate learner differences and needs.

Conclusion

Even with our limitations (time) during this project, I felt as though we made a positive shift in our learning environment. Because the students provided feedback about the flipped classroom setting, moving forward, I would like to have a happy mix of our “traditional” Orff approach and the flipped classroom approach. I DO miss being part of the musical discoveries when we learn something new. At least in the flipped setting, we can use our technology for review and/or extended activities. Uh oh. I think I’m on to something. . .

Special thanks to @Shazahmed for putting up with my antics and @YasmeenMunshi for lending an ear during carpool. And thank YOU, Coetail, for being a part of my learning journey!

Bop it! Twist it! Shake it! FLIP IT! (Course 4 Final Project)

Image via Pexels (Teono123 No)
Introduction

Upon hearing that I am including upper elementary to my teaching schedule next year, I immediately started thinking about the possibility of creating a unit of inquiry that incorporates elements from courses one through four. This unit combines the concepts of “Geeking Out” from Course 1, digital citizenship from Course 2, design principles (my fav!) from Course 3 and flipped classroom (as evidenced by the unit title) from Course 4.

Short story…

One of my students was injured during recess. He was rushed to the hospital for a broken arm and was house bound for quite sometime. His fellow classmates showed their concern by helping to finish his art work and sending “Get Well” notes with his older brother. One student came up and said, “Miss! He is absent for our xylophone songs! How will he learn the music while he’s at home?!”  Hmm. . . if only there was a way to show and teach him the songs that we’re learning. . .

Task: Students will create a teaching and learning video instructing their peers (and/or others) how to play (insert music title) on a variety of instruments. They will demonstrate their knowledge of the music by performing and modeling how the music should be played. They will use (tech tbd) to create their videos and upload it to Google Classroom for reflection, feedback and assessment. As a result, we will have a collection of teaching and learning videos to share with the school community.
Concerns

The assignment states, ” What are some of your concerns about redesigning this unit?” Well, I’m not redesigning it. I’m designing it from the ground up. I won’t have any prior knowledge or experience with this unit, but I am confident that I, along with support from my IT team, can plan and execute this project!

Shift in pedagogy

With this unit, it will be interesting to, again, let go of the reigns and have the students lead the unit and design their own teaching and learning videos. I am hoping that the students can not only create an end product that they are proud of, but also reflect upon the process of creating and sharing music with others.

Skills and attitudes

The Transdisciplinary Skills focused on this unit are:

Communication Skills – listening, speaking, viewing, presenting and nonverbal communication

Thinking Skills – acquisition of knowledge by gaining specific facts, ideas and vocabulary; analysis by taking apart their knowledge, separating into component parts, seeking relationships

Self-Management Skills – gross motor skills, fine motor skills, organization skills, and time management skills

The attitudes focused on this unit are:

Commitment demonstrating perseverance through the duration of the unit of inquiry and following through with end goals

Creativity – expression of unique ideas as evidenced by their teaching and learning video

“Someday we’ll find it. . . the rainbow connection”

For anyone familiar with the IB, specifically the PYP, framework, the notion of Connected Learning isn’t too far fetched. Connected Learning? Huh? The jargon might be new, but take a look…

Wikipedia defines Connected Learning as,

“…a type of learning that integrates personal interest, peer relationships, and achievement in academic, civic, or career-relevant areas.”

The Connected Learning model suggests that,

“…youth learn best when: they are interested in what they are learning; they have peers and mentors who share these interests; and their learning is directed toward opportunity and recognition.”

Certain components of the PYP echo the Connected Learning approach. Students are given autonomy to showcase their learning for their summative assessments. During a unit of inquiry, students are often seen in partners or groups for collaboration, feedback, and support . Furthermore, students are given the opportunity to take action – to go beyond the summative assessment – as a result of the learning process. Their action extends the student’s learning or it could have a wider social impact; for example, to benefit the school community.

I’ve color-coded the possible relationships between the two. See what I mean? Obviously there’s more to each framework, but you get the idea. You can read more on the research synthesis report of the Connected Learning Research Network here.

However, if your schedule doesn’t allow you to dive into the 100 page report, Dr. Mimi Ito’s article, Learning That Connects, provides a quick summary of Connected Learning. She discusses its main principles and presents current studies of the shift of education with the youth culture. All was good and well until I came near the end of the article in a section entitled “Offering Opportunity.” Dr. Ito says,

“Helping equip young people to thrive in this environment of abundance, cultivating mindfulness and attentiveness are a new set of capacities for a new kind of landscape that we have to navigate as educators.”

“Educational institutions need to connect young people’s learning to their social lives, their communities, their interests and their careers.”  

I get you, Dr. Ito. We’re in the process of doing just that. But what about everyone else? What about other educators who don’t have access to this research? What about schools who lack the resources to train their teachers? What about Title I schools who can’t afford to study the research, much less the technology to be (and stay) connected? One of the core properties of the Connected Learning experience is that it is production-centered – “digital tools provide opportunities for producing and creating a wide variety of media, knowledge and cultural content in experimental and active ways.” Schools serving low-income students and families sadly have to prioritise their needs.  As much as they would like to provide the tools for the future success of their students, the notion just seems out of reach. I feel that we are missing out on THEIR potential. But how can we reach them? How can we connect? Connectivism and the Connected Learning approach won’t work if we can’t do just that: connect. 

Suggestions?

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSFLZ-MzIhM[/youtube]