MIKE UNIFORM SIERRA INDIA CHARLIE

Image via Pexels (Kevin Ku)

I may be taking a different approach to week three’s blog, but I’ll have a go. I present everyday. You read that right. Every. Day. My Keynote presentations are part of my PYP learning environment. 

As the students enter the classroom, Mr. Mac, a behavior strategy under the CHAMPS program is displayed on the SMART board to remind students of how we enter the music classroom. The same slide will then be displayed at the end when they exit. We use this routine weekly as I only see my students once a week; it helps them remember the expectations. We go through the following sequence where “Give Me Five!” is shown on the screen. I raise my hand, the students follow, and we, through TPR, go through the meaning of “Give Me Five”. At this point, since I know have the students’ full attention, we go through the lessons for the day. We usually begin with a movement sequence where the slide contains short lyrics and an image of a marching band. For those students who are emerging readers, the text is displayed and they can participate in the chant while incorporating our movement to the steady beat. I know, I know.  I have written everything we say on the screen. I’m pretty sure that is faux pas number one according to Don McMillan’s Life After Death by Powerpoint

But for good reason. The children are now connecting the lyrics that they have learned by rote and assigning letters and words. The lyrics were not provided when I first taught it. It was only a simple image with movements associated with it. But now with the text displayed, they are practicing their English reading skills in the music setting. They LOVE pointing out the words while saying the chant. You can’t fault me for that. In fact, I should get bonus points.

Our class resumes with the introduction of the composer of the month. The slide contains a world map with the composer’s home country highlighted, an image of the composer, title of the piece and (sneakily) embed an audio clip on the slide. Depending on the composer, the activity could be a simple “sit in a circle and listen to the music” (with a focus on musical elements such as dynamics or tempo) or a movement activity with props (i.e. scarves, ribbons, bouncy balls, etc.) I liked Jeff’s idea of adding animation to presentations when appropriate. I speak of animation within the same slide and not transition between slides. Here’s why: when the students see the “typical” COTM slide, they are already programmed with the format of the slide. The world map is shown with a star to locate Qatar. The composer’s home country is highlighted, and I go through this silly, but effective, script that if we were to fly FIFTEEN hours by plane from Qatar, we can visit (insert composer’s name)’s home in (insert composer’s birth country).

Updated slide with animation

An animated arrow, for example, from Qatar to a specific country would add an element of fun – but with a purpose. They are making connections about where they are compared to the rest of the world. This simple learning engagement can trigger their curiosity, and as a result, they inquire about other composers and where they come from. When I initially designed this slide, I thought it would just be a display or a decoration to support the music behind it. Little did I know it would be an integral part of my daily lesson.

Keynote vs. Google Slides 

I’ve been creating these “presentations” for a few years now and I’ve come to realise that there should be a program where Keynote and Google Slides become one. I’m not clever enough to create this, but if anyone out there is, you heard it here first! I love that I can edit Slides from any computer; but Keynote has a more beautiful template to work with. For my context, videos and music embedded onto the slides are essential. Google. Are you listening? I shouldn’t have to put nuclear launch codes JUST to add music to my slides. And I’m not even adding music. I have to convert my MP3s to a YouTube video AND THEN add it to my slide. It’s very distracting. Even though I adjust the size of the YouTube video, it doesn’t look clean. Keynote makes it easy to just drag and drop music onto a slide. And what’s more: it’s invisible in presentation mode. Oooooh! Aaaaah! I can even edit where to start and stop if I only want a short excerpt. As an aside, did you know that there are wireless presentation remotes that do NOT work with Google Slides? Oh yes. I would know. I’ve owned three different versions (this one does NOT work). Because we transition from movement, to listening, to writing, to singing, etc., I don’t have time to waste and walk to the computer and change slides. With the presentation remote in hand, or with a special helper, I have a tightly paced music lesson.

For now, I’ll stick with Keynote for it’s ease and visually appealing slides. And I’ll definitely incorporate some of the design principles that I’ve learned this week for my future presentations. But if anyone wants to create “Key-slides” or “Google-note”, am happy to go 50/50 with you!

Oh happy day!

By the way, if you’re using Keynote and need to convert it to Google Slides, this video is handy. Enjoy!

 

… – – – … (Course 2 Final Project)

Image via Pixabay
Introduction

Course 2 has come and gone in a flash! There were great discussions of copyright and plagiarism; I learned so much and gained resources for images via Pixabay or Pexels. We spoke of online privacy and yet leaving positive digital footprints. Furthermore, we reflected on empowering connections among our students. The bottom line? Be a good person – on AND offline. And then all of a sudden, there was the final project. SOS! Where did THAT come from?! Help! I sent my very own SOS via Twitter. But first, I had to YouTube HOW to use Twitter (facepalm). Huge thanks to Carolin (@carolin_escobar) and Nick (@NicholasKGarvin) for coming to the rescue!

Final Project: Option 3-Responsible Use Agreement (RUA)/Responsible Use Policy (RUP)

Our group collaborated on modifying and updating an RUA from Nick’s school, UWC Thailand. The school currently does not have a Tech Director and any documents pertaining to technology was outdated. We opted to enhance the existing RUA by creating something more accessible for the students. Considering Nick and I both teach lower elementary students, I thought that it would be appropriate and valuable.  As a result, the language written in the student contracts were more age appropriate, and in addition, we created a resource for teachers to use to introduce and discuss proper use of equipment and fundamental aspects of digital citizenship – I present to you our Digital Citizenship Ebook for K-2.

The Ebook was created using Google Slides as the main platform. We collaborated on each slide by making comments, adding photos, videos, and additional resources. The Ebook can be easily customised by any teacher at any school, and it can also be shared with parents. The language, photos and videos were appropriate for K-2 students (including ELL students).

The Ebook has a corresponding Google Doc called the Digital Citizenship and and Responsible Use in the Primary School (K-5). The document restates the student behavior, proper use and fundamental aspects of digital citizenship under the headings of Be Safe, Be Respectful and Be Responsible – the school-wide essential agreements that students are already familiar with.

Reflection

Google Hangouts (credit to Carolin Escobar)

The Course 2 Final Project was enlightening to say the least. We had to overcome challenges such as, how can we find a common meeting time to conduct a Google Hangout if we are in four different time zones?! Thanks to technology we were able to make this work. Comments on our Google Doc and Slides made it relatively easy for us to maintain contact in order to ask questions and receive feedback. Messages via Twitter also kept me on my toes. It helped me REMEMBER to check Twitter once in awhile. I am so thankful for my team for their knowledge, insight and patience during this project. 

Shukraan jazilaan!